I am not a person to say I told you so, but here I am doing it. I support responsible care of your honeybees, whatever you may think that be. More importantly, I feel that the industry should be responsible, reflective, and careful in the legalization and recommendations of chemical products offered to the public. I have to say, in reading the research on this product, I strongly support BeeMaid’s choice to no longer sell the product MiteAway Quick Strips. They have chosen to no longer sell the product unless they can be sure that the products, when used properly, do not cause a hazard to the honeybees welfare, and this product does not offer that certainty. Here is what I wrote in 2011:

“Of these tests, neither the formic content of the existing honey on site when the treatment was made nor the quantity of hives queen-right (hives that hadnt killed the queen) or quantity of dead bees was shared. Janet presented only all of the beneficial aspects of mite deaths and her encouragement of use. When asked who was he major funder, she said NOD, the developer and patent holder of the MiteAway Quick Strip. When the audience asked deeper questions about her research, she argued that the research was inconclusive because NOD had contacted them just before the research was completed and alerted the researchers that the product in which they had been given had the wrong concentrations of chemical, making the research that NOD was funding inert! read on here…

I was not eager to share this information, I am not an eager whistle blower, but when I went to the NOD website and saw the Canadian Honey Council logo there, I was shocked. This is a product that may lead to the aggressive and harmful attack on honeybees. I recommend that you look in to the NOD site, and e-mail the CHC and ask about their involvement in the development of NOD products without proper and viable research! Talk about putting the mite before the bee! ”

So, if you are looking to purchase this product, you will have to contact NOD directly to have the product shipped to you. If you are looking to use formic acid as a treatment, I highly recommend that you choose to use the raw product at a 65% concentration and not risk the MAQ product.

1Comment
  • John
    Posted at 22:29h, 19 January Reply

    I politely disagree. I’ve returned to beekeeping after 30 years and am distraught at the huge number of pests/issues facing beekeepers in 2015. Last year I attempted to use monitoring/cleaning/hygiene to conrol bee pests. By September my single hive was overrun by Varroa and I could tell the bees were suffering.

    I applied MAQS according to directions. Two strips went on top of the brood chamber. I closed the hive and hoped for the best.

    The next morning I counted 14 dead bees at the entrance. The next morning, about twice that many. After that, a few more than normal but less than 14. After five days it was the normal two or three.

    Results – daily removal of the IPM board beginning on day three showed a carpet of dead and dying mites (served the little bastards right!) By the end of two weeks the bees were mite-free based on IPM monitoring and have remained so throughout the winter.
    MAQS also killed a couple of wax moth larvae I had not previously seen, along with four hive beetles.

    I will not hesitate to use MAQS this season or in the future; the benefit to the hive is obvious.
    **What the heck happened in the last 30 years? I used to work for a commercial beekeeper in Florida and all I ever worried about was wax moths, rattlesnakes, and bored rednecks.**

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